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Asbel Kiprop: This Is Why I Will No Longer Fight EPO Charges

Asbel Kiprop of Kenya celebrates victory ahead of Silas Kiplagat of Kenya and Matthew Centrowitz of the USA in the men's 1500 metres final during day eight of 13th IAAF World Athletics Championships at Daegu Stadium on September 3, 2011 in Daegu, South Korea. PHOTO/IAAF/GETTY
Asbel Kiprop of Kenya celebrates victory ahead of Silas Kiplagat of Kenya and Matthew Centrowitz of the USA in the men's 1500 metres final during day eight of 13th IAAF World Athletics Championships at Daegu Stadium on September 3, 2011 in Daegu, South Korea. PHOTO/IAAF/GETTY
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NAIROBI, Kenya- Facing what he believes is a system that has conspired to paint him a drug cheat, Olympic champion and three-time men 1500m titleholder, Asbel Kiprop, is now resigned to his fate ahead of a scheduled hearing on his recombinant Erythropoietin (rEPO) use.

In a long post on his official Facebook page on Wednesday night, Kiprop maintained he had given up on attempts to clear his name at world body’s IAAF Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) that has charged him with illegal use of the banned blood booster after two of his urine samples tested positive.

Speaking to SportPesa News on Thursday morning, Kiprop underlined why he feels he is fighting a losing battle against a system he maintains has been set up to use him as a sacrificial lamb in the fight against doping in athletics.

The Beijing 2018 Olympics title winner, who added the Daegu 2011, Moscow 2013 and Beijing 2015 world titles to his collection, also charged that his Italian manager, Federico Rosa and local authorities have abandoned him, informing his decision to give up on fighting the damaging charges facing him.

“I have already sent them my defence and I leave it up to them. If they find me guilty, even though I know I’m not, let them have their way,” the bitter runner who was hailed as one of the finest middle distance track runners on the planet lamented.

“The AIU are the ones who sent people to collect samples, test them, retesting the samples, prosecuting and appointing judges and even if you know you’re sincere and innocent, how can you expect to win?

“They are the ones running the testing laboratories, their own doctors give their opinion and can anyone expect them to give an opinion against them? They are everything, corrupt as well and lying to the world to show since they were formed last year, they are working.

Tribulations start

“They are sacrificing me to be seen they are credible,” the two-time IAAF World Cross champion further alleged.

On his tribulations that started on May 5 when British publication, the Daily Mail identified him as the top athlete facing a possible four-year ban for rEPO use, KIprop admitted he had ran out of money to mount his defence.

“I don’t have resources. Federico if not helping now, the Ministry of Sports have not taken any concern, I have been left alone, like alone to fight this.

“If at all I had resources to fight this, I would have done it to the bitter end because I’m innocent and I would win, not for only me but for everyone else so that such things do not arise,” Kiprop claimed.

Gold medal winner Kenya's Elijah Motonei Manangoi (C) poses with silver medallist Kenya's Timothy Cheruiyot and Kenya's Asbel Kiprop after the final of the men's 1500m athletics event at the 2017 IAAF World Championships at the London Stadium in London on August 13, 2017. PHOTO/AFP

Gold medal winner Kenya’s Elijah Motonei Manangoi (C) poses with silver medallist Kenya’s Timothy Cheruiyot and Kenya’s Asbel Kiprop after the final of the men’s 1500m athletics event at the 2017 IAAF World Championships at the London Stadium in London on August 13, 2017. PHOTO/AFP

“I do not have the resources to challenge the IAAF which is a rich company and I’m an individual. If the Ministry and the federation (Athletics Kenya) come to my aid, they would be seen as if they are supporting doping and be treated like Russia, that is their fear,” the 2010 African 1500m champion emphasised.

“This is a cartel world, I do not know why they feel they have to sacrifice. Why me? I have been much vocal on the dangers of doping,” Kiprop wondered.

As he waits on the AIU hearing scheduled for London to decide whether he will be served with a lengthy ban, the Kenyan distance running star is mulling the possibility of approaching the Lausanne based Court for Arbitration of Sport for remedy.

Regret decision

“I have emailed them my decision to wait for the verdict and from there, I will decide what is next. I feel they regret this decision, the process they used was wrong,” Kiprop who earlier alleged he sent money to AIU Doping Control Officers (DCOs) who came to his home last November for an out of competition test through mobile money transfer insisted.

The two DCOs, identified as Simon ‘Mburu’ Karugu and Paul Scott, whom he was familiar with from past tests- came to his home in Iten on the morning of November 27, 2017 having informed him a day earlier of their visit.

AIU later admitted the pair had contravened rules spelt out in the anti-doping protocol claiming however, it did not have bearing in any Adverse Analytical Findings of the A and B samples collected from Kiprop who claimed he believed they were switched when he went to his bedroom to get his phone to send them cash.

“I did not have any cash on me at the time. The previous evening, I was in a hotel in Eldoret where I paid through M-Pesa (mobile money). If I was guilty of any doping, I had the chance to run from where I had declared on my Whereabouts’ Form.

“These case is expensive to fight against. Let’s wait and see now that I have emailed them on my decision (not to contest),” Kiprop stated.

Below is his unedited latest Facebook post reproduced in full;

Greetings Ladies & gentlemen, I’m writing to appreciate everyone for their concerns in my case. Those who are accusing me and my legal team.

  1. It’s my personal handwriting and I’m speaking my mind on the matter.
    3. I would like to let everyone in this case acknowledge the fact that I did not injected myself with EPO knowingly or unknowingly.
  2. Despite the fact that I’m willing to go to any possible heights in proofing my innocence, it’s evident that ‘regardless’. I will not be able to win back my CREDIBILITY not even if my accusers will be able beyond doubt to acknowledge my innocence.
  3. In order not to wrestle with my accusers for what looks like a common goal yet not. I’m not convinced but no option to let them have their say.
  4. I do not have money to meet legal fees and find qualified physicians who meets standards to give their opinion on my sample and discredit any possible unjust reason to why the sample resulted to analytical rEPO finding. I’m financially weak to challenge my accuser the IAAF whom I have always worked hard for to bring the best in me for the sport and myself. However I’m rich in TRUTH and sincerity, this seem to mean nothing.
  5. I’m left not to admit doping but to fall a victim of my accusers none admitted liability.
  6. To pay a price of an iniquity I did not commit only because I believe in fairness and play true.
  7. I did not dope.
  8. I have let the struggle to proof my innocence go. Not because I doped but I take the sacrifice because I support the anti doping campaign. Thank me later.

Furthermore and for the reason that I have medals in my home that now seem to mean nothing; I’m convinced to challenge time and proof human ability beyond negativity.

I will remain loyal to authorities as my religion commands and I will INSPIRE.


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